STEM Friday

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Books

Cities: Discover How They Work

Cities: Discover How They Work with 25 Projects

9781619302136

What does the word “city” make you think of? Traffic? Museums? Skyscrapers? People? Cities are thriving, vibrant communities that operate on several different levels—literally! Underground, on the ground, and way above ground, city dwellers are busy making their patch of earth as efficient, comfortable, and user-friendly as possible.

In Cities: Discover How They Work with 25 Projects, readers delve into all of the great things that make cities the wonderful places we love to both live in and visit. For instance, did you know that streetlights have been around for over 2,000 years? Benjamin Franklin was the first to light the dark streets of the United States. And how do cities handle all of the waste produced by the billions of residents? Wastewater treatment plants are where contaminants get removed before the cleaned water is flushed out to a lake, river, or ocean, or used for irrigation.

Cities are marvels of engineering and offer the perfect opportunity for students to flex those STEM muscles. Readers ages 9-12 are asked to figure out methods to provide water to the top floors of sky scrapers, keep cities safe during natural disasters such as earthquakes, and provide a steady supply of energy to inhabitants who live both near and far from power stations.

History, science, engineering, architecture, and technology combine in this fascinating book about a subject that billions of people will find familiar but only a handful—such as the kids who read Cities—will be able to explain.

Click here to check out a video of the animated growth of Midtown Manhattan!

 

STEM Friday

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

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STEM Friday: It’s Electric!

Explore Electricity! with 25 Great Projects
by Carmella Van Vleet

Zap! Electricity i9781619301801s all around us. You wake up, you turn on the light, turn up the thermostat, open the refrigerator to get your orange juice, put some bread in the toaster for breakfast, and then lightening cracks outside. Everywhere we turn, our world is affected by the power of electricity.

In Carmella Van Vleet’s new book from Nomad Press, Explore Electricity! with 25 Great Projects, kids 6-9 will learn how humans discovered electricity and harnessed it for their own use. Circuitry, how currents work, electromagnetism, how motors work, alternative electricity – all of these topics are accompanied by glossary words, bits of fun information, safety tips, and hands-on projects that are easy and fun to do.

Did you know a frog helped invent the battery? An Italian teacher was using metal tools to dissect a frog when the dead frog actually moved! Another teacher, Alessandro Volta, heard about the moving dead frog and eventually proved that an electric charge had passed between the metal tools. He discovered that chemical reactions between molecules could cause electrons to move, and if the electrons passed through a conductor (like frog juice!) they could produce an electric charge. A battery was born!

electric

With Explore Electricity!, kids can create their own circuit, make a lemon battery, experiment with static electricity, and lots of other fun projects. Have fun discovering the power of the world around you!

Today’s post is part of STEM Friday, a weekly round-up of children’s science, engineering, math and technology books.

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Join STEM Friday! We invite you to join us!

  • Write about STEM each Friday on your blog.
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It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Happy STEM Friday to all!
Andi from Nomad


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STEM Friday: Exploring the Universal, Invisible Force of Gravity!

Explore Gravity! With 25 Great Projects

By Cindy Blobaum

Ages 6-9

9781619302075

Did you know that because there is no atmosphere on the moon, there is also no wind or weather. Footprints from astronauts who walked on the moon over 40 years ago are still there and it will probably take another 10 to 100 million years before they are covered by dust. How cool is that fun fact?! It’s taken directly from inside the pages of Explore Gravity! With 25 Great Projects.

For STEM Friday today we’re featuring our new book at Nomad Press, Explore Gravity! With 25 Great Projects, for kids ages 6 to 9. Gravity is a thing, it’s a noun, it’s something that affects everything in the universe, but because it’s invisible, it’s also a concept, something that can be hard to grasp with the brain. Explore Gravity! encourages readers to experiment with the concept of gravity while emphasizing data collection and scientific processing skills. Combining concept with application is the very core of STEM!!

roller coaster

Explore Gravity! introduces kids to the concepts of matter, attraction, and gravitational pull. Projects include creating a working model of a scale to learn what “weight” really means and how it’s affected by gravity. By playing with various weights to make a marvelous mobile, readers learn about the center of balance and how martial artists use this knowledge to throw their weight around. All the projects in this book are easy to follow, require little adult supervision, and use commonly found household products, many from the recycling box!

Today’s post is part of STEM Friday, a weekly round-up of children’s science, engineering, math and technology books.

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Join STEM Friday! We invite you to join us!

  • Write about STEM each Friday on your blog.
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It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Happy STEM Friday to all!

Jane at Nomad


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STEM Friday: Investigating the Tallest Structures in the World!

Skyscrapers: Investigate Feats of Engineering with 25 Projects
by Donna Latham
Illustrated by Andrew Christensen
Nomad Press, 2013

978161301931

Can you identify what structure was nicknamed the “Metal Asparagus” by some who found it hideously unappealing when it was completed in 1889? I’ll give you a hint. It’s perhaps the most famous and recognizable structure in the world. You guessed it, the Eiffel Tower! The Eiffel Tower is just one of the many structures around the world that define our cityscapes. And it’s not even one of the oldest. In fact, humans have endeavored to build tall since long, long ago. The first known “skyscrapers” were built of sun-dried mud and bricks. These buildings, called ziggurats, were stepped pyramids built in the ancient Mesopotamian Valley as offerings to the powerful gods living in the skies. Today our skyscrapers reach much taller than these primitive forms, and they’re not just monuments; they’re homes, offices, museums, and everything else that you could imagine!

Skyscrapers_9781619301900

For STEM Friday this week we’re featuring one of our newest titles at Nomad Press, Skyscrapers: Investigate Feats of Engineering with 25 Projects for kids ages 9 and older. What requires more STEM knowledge than a skyscraper! Designing and building a skyscraper requires knowledge of internal forces like tension, torsion, and compression, as well as external forces like hurricanes and earthquakes. So many variables must be considered when building the tallest structures in the world—structures people live in and use every day! Our book is an excellent introduction to civil and structural engineering. It even provides an overview of the engineering design process and the steps engineers follow when they tackle a problem, leading them to a solution for a new product, system, or structure.

Projects in our book include building a sugar cube step pyramid and a freestanding spaghetti skyscraper! It also includes cool facts. For example, did you know the Empire State Building gets struck by lightning around 100 times PER YEAR?!?! It was actually designed as a lightning rod for neighboring buildings. Who knew? Now you do!

Today’s post is part of STEM Friday, a weekly round-up of children’s science, engineering, math and technology books.

Join STEM Friday! We invite you to join us!

  • Write about STEM each Friday on your blog.
  • Copy the STEM Friday button to use in your blog post.
  • Link your post to the comments of our weekly STEM Friday Round-up. (Please use the link to your STEM Friday post, not the address of your blog. Thanks!)

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It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Happy STEM Friday to all!

Jane at Nomad


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CSI = STEM

Forensics
By Carla Mooney
Illustrated by Samuel Carbaugh
Nomad Press, 2013

Forensics_200pxWhat does CSI have to do with STEM, you ask? Everything.

We’re not just talking about the CBS hit series. We’re talking about real crime scene investigation. We’re talking about Forensic science. From the technology used to analyze blood spatter to the mathematics implemented to calculate time of death, even the easiest to solve crime scene draws upon science, technology, engineering, and math. That’s why for STEM Friday this week we’re featuring a title in our newest series, Inquire and Investigate, for readers ages 12 and older. Forensics: Uncover the Science and Technology of Crime Scene Investigation invites kids into the fascinating world of crime scene investigation.

Evidence is like pieces in a large puzzle; it takes an entire forensic team to put the evidence together to solve the crime. An analysis of blood spatter velocity, for example, can determine what weapon was used and from where the impact came. Furthermore, forensics specialists have to understand the properties of blood and how it reacts to forces that act upon it. And then there are trace materials, like fingerprints, hair, and even bones to be collected and analyzed from a crime scene. That’s a lot of science and technology!  We can be sure that as science and technology progress, so too will the tools for collecting evidence, making this a relevant STEM related subject. Furthermore, there are hundreds of forensic related careers! The options are limitless within the field. Kids can become fingerprint examiners, forensic pathologists, forensic anthropologists, or even forensic entomologists. The list goes on and on!

Today’s post is part of STEM Friday, a weekly round-up of children’s science, engineering, math and technology books.

Join STEM Friday! We invite you to join us!

  • Write about STEM each Friday on your blog.
  • Copy the STEM Friday button to use in your blog post.
  • Link your post to the comments of our weekly STEM Friday Round-up. (Please use the link to your STEM Friday post, not the address of your blog. Thanks!)

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It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Happy STEM Friday to all! Jane at Nomad

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Up, Up and Away, it’s STEM Friday!

Explore Flight! With 25 Great Projects
By Anita Yasuda
Illustrated by Bryan Stone

Have you ever been in a plane 30,000 feet above the earth, sipping on ginger ale, munching on peanuts, and thought to yourself, this is crazy? I have. But maybe it’s just because I don’t always love to fly! The way we fly today, going wherever we want to go—around the world, into space—is a remarkably incredible feat of engineering, and one that we’ve become accustomed to. Imagine if the Wright Brothers could see us now: sitting on an airplane with 200 other passengers, seat belts fastened, movies playing on our iPads, beverage carts in the aisle, headed for vacation in Hawaii!

Flight_200px

For STEM Friday this week we’re featuring one of our newest tiles, Explore Flight! With 25 Great Projects for kids ages 6-9. It’s a perfect STEM topic, given the history of our fascination with flight, dating back to the invention of kites in China in 1000 BCE. We’ve come a long way since then, to say the least! Have you ever tried to explain to a kid how planes stay up in the air? It’s a combination of lift, gravity, thrust, and drag. When all four of these forces are in balance, an object, like a plane, can fly. Simple, right? Ha! Yes, in theory. It’s simple for birds. They’re naturally designed to balance these forces. But lots and lots of trials (and many, many errors!) have occurred in order for humans to make airplanes one of the safest modes of travel today.

Our fascination with flight has made the universe a much smaller place while answering many questions but opening up so many more. How we fly, where we fly, what we fly, and why we fly will only continue to evolve, push boundaries, and raise questions, which is why this topic is so relevant to STEM education!

Take the latest news headlines for example. You can’t miss the debate over drones. Are we perhaps pushing technology too far? How will we use our ability to fly in ten years? 20? Our children will soon be considering, debating, and solving these questions!

Today’s post is part of STEM Friday, a weekly round-up of children’s science, engineering, math and technology books.

Join STEM Friday! We invite you to join us!

  • Write about STEM each Friday on your blog.
  • Copy the STEM Friday button to use in your blog post.
  • Link your post to the comments of our weekly STEM Friday Round-up. (Please use the link to your STEM Friday post, not the address of your blog. Thanks!)

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It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Happy STEM Friday to all!

Jane at Nomad

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STEM Friday: Understanding Natural Disasters

NaturalDisasters_Cvr_500pxUnderstanding Natural Disasters
By Kathleen Reilly
Illustrated by Tom Casteel
Nomad Press

Much of the East Coast is still reeling from the infamous Frankenstorm that struck our shores this past October. As its storm-nickname suggests, Hurricane Sandy was a bizarre and indomitable intermixing of atmospheric events. Because its path was so atypical, its magnitude felt that much more frightening. It’s not often a hurricane of such strength spirals toward the Big Apple, the most populated city in the United States at 19 million people.

Natural disasters remind us of our vulnerability as a species. They remind us that we cannot control everything. They remind us that we can do our best to prepare for the worst, but even our best defenses are not imperishable in the face of nature.  And they probably never will be. In reality, New Orleans will never be completely safe from flooding, and the Jersey shore will probably get hit again.

But what if we can understand these disasters better? What if we can at least get a stronger and stronger grip on how and why they form? Advances in technology have helped us to predict earthquakes and hurricanes much more accurately than just ten years ago. Advances in engineering have helped us to better protect what we love—our family, friends, homes, towns and cities.

Natural disasters are a pertinent STEM topic, relating to how and why they occur as well as how we can build defenses to protect ourselves against them. That’s why we’re featuring our book, Natural Disasters: Investigate Earth’s Most Destructive Forces with 25 Projects for STEM Friday this week. This title introduces young readers to nature’s most common and destructive disasters throughout history, explains what causes them, describes their impact on civilizations, and tells how people today cope with natural disasters. Readers are taught the science behind these natural events, and then challenged to put their technology and engineering skills to use as they build a wind tunnel, experiment with wind speed, and construct a shake table.

Among other things, this book teaches readers that the more we know, the more we can do, which is very much a STEM theme!

Today’s post is part of STEM Friday, a weekly round-up of children’s science, engineering, math and technology books.

Join STEM Friday! We invite you to join us!

  • Write about STEM each Friday on your blog.
  • Copy the STEM Friday button to use in your blog post.
  • Link your post to the comments of our weekly STEM Friday Round-up. (Please use the link to your STEM Friday post, not the address of your blog. Thanks!)

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Happy STEM Friday to all! Jane at Nomad


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STEM Friday: Feats of Engineering

Bridges and Tunnels: Investigate Feats of Engineering with 25 Projects by Donna Latham
2012 Nomad Press

Sunny mornings like today always conjure up some of the spectacular vistas that stick in my mind from all sorts of places I’ve been in my life. Since I spent many years in the Bay Area, the views across the bay are some of the most frequent. And I’m not alone. Once you cross the Golden Gate Bridge, you never forget it. The view is nothing short of stunning in all directions. But there’s a lot more to that bridge than meets the eye.

I’d like to introduce you to our new Investigate Feats of Engineering titles by featuring the first in this category that we’ve done. Bridges and Tunnels: Investigate Feats of Engineering with 25 Projects invites children 9 and up to explore the innovation and physical science behind these remarkable structures that our world depends on. They’ll learn about some of the seemingly insurmountable obstacles like vast canyons and mountain ranges that engineers and builders have tackled to design and construct such amazing passageways. Bridges and tunnels are lifelines that connect people and places. And some of the world’s most spectacular bridges have equally amazing stories to go along with them.

This book takes a challenging topic and makes it accessible to children. Hands-on activities encourage children to embrace the important engineering skill of trial and error. They’ll experiment with a triangular toothpick dome, liquefaction, and corrosion. They’ll make an egg bungee jump and a soda pop can engine. And with some great history thrown in, there are many lessons to be learned!

Enjoy this title and we look forward to Canals and Dams: Investigate Feats of Engineering with 25 Projects coming soon!

Today’s post is part of STEM Friday, a weekly round-up of children’s science, engineering, math and technology books.

Join STEM Friday!

We invite you to join us!

  • Write about STEM each Friday on your blog.
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Happy STEM Friday to all!

Pam at Nomad


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STEM Friday: The Invention of Time!

Did you know there’s a clock in Boulder, Colorado that can keep the time to within 1 second in 3.7 billion years?! It’s considered the most accurate clock in the world. It’s an optical clock, and what that means is that instead of using the vibration of atoms or molecules, like our current atomic clocks use, it uses light to keep time.

That’s pretty cool. But how did this method of keeping time evolve? And why is it even important to be this accurate?

When a child (or an adult for that matter!) asks, what is time, the explanation isn’t an easy one. Yes, time is a way to keep track of our lives—the school year, the season, the age of our dog (in human and doggy years)…it seems like time has always existed. Well, it has, but what time is today—seconds, minutes, days, etc.—isn’t what time was millions of years ago, when telling time didn’t exist as we know it. It’s easy to forget that the act of telling time is one of the greatest inventions of mankind!

It’s easy to forget that things like minutes and months are an invention in the first place! So that’s why we’re featuring, Timekeeping: Explore the History and Science of Telling Time with 15 Projects for today’s STEM Friday post. Because understanding timekeeping involves knowledge of all of these things: science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Timekeeping, a book for kids ages 9-12,explores how humans have measured the passage of time since, well, since the beginning of “time,” when the sun told the time, and days were kept with a shadow clock. Nights were kept by the phases of the moon. It teaches kids about the process of mathematically calculating calendars, and about all of the phases our current Gregorian calendar has gone through to be the twelve-month, 365-day calendar that it is now. They’ll learn how to make a sundial and a clepsydra, a clock devised by the Egyptians that uses dripping water to track time. They’ll also learn cool facts like why Daylight Savings Time exists, and that another name for it is “War Time,” because it was originally implemented to save fuel during WWI.

The projects, facts, and much more make reading this book no waste of time!

Today’s post is part of STEM Friday, a weekly round-up of children’s science, engineering, math and technology books.

Join STEM Friday!

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  • Write about STEM each Friday on your blog.
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  • Link your post to the comments of our weekly STEM Friday Round-up. (Please use the link to your STEM Friday post, not the address of your blog. Thanks!)

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Blast off for STEM!

Once again here at Nomad Press we’re hosting STEM Friday. It’s a chance for us to feature children’s books from all over the web that incorporate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Leave your links and information in the comments.

This week for STEM Friday we want to feature two of our books about the solar system. The first, Explore the Solar System!, is for kids ages 6-9, and the second, Amazing Solar System Projects You Can Build Yourself, is for kids ages 9 and up. We’re featuring these two books on space because this week STEM Friday happens to follow two important anniversaries: the anniversary of the first woman in space on June 16 AND the anniversary of the first American woman in space on June 18!

In 1963 Valentina Tereshkova, a Soviet cosmonaut, became the first woman to fly in space when she orbited Earth 48 times in the spacecraft Vostok 6. A crater on the Moon is named in her honor. Twenty years later, in 1983, Sally Ride became the first American woman in space on the shuttle Challenger (STS-7).

Pioneering accolades aside, Sally Ride is a pretty great woman, especially in the world of science and technology. In 2001 she founded Sally Ride Science to help motivate girls and young women to pursue careers in science, math, and technology. Among other things, the company develops programs for parents and teachers to help spark and sustain interest in these subjects. She’s a STEM torchbearer! And she’s not just a name behind the program either. She’s launched science-centered festivals for girls, where she too participates in the workshops led by female scientists. When asked about the progress of the program in an interview with SUCCESS magazine, Ride said, “We need to make science cool again…If we can make science and engineering cool again, maybe our work is done.”

Sally Ride Science has teamed up with ExxonMobil with a project called “Let’s Solve This” to promote STEM inspired programs that transform student performance. When, in 2009, the Program for International Students Assessment ranked US students 17th in the world in science and 25th in math, Sally said, let’s change that.

The only way to change that is to teach and inspire and make these subjects rocket to the top of our children’s interest lists! Hey, this woman went to space. She knows first-hand that the universe is awesome!

Sally Ride, you make science cool in our book!

Join STEM Friday! We invite you to join us!

  • Write about STEM each Friday on your blog.
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STEM Friday

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

  • Link your post to the comments of our weekly STEM Friday Round-up. (Please use the link to your STEM Friday post, not the address of your blog. Thanks!)

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