STEM Friday

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Books


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Cracking Codes with Python

Cracking Codes with Python: An Introduction to Building and Breaking Ciphers
by Al Sweigart (Author)

Booktalk: Learn how to program in Python while making and breaking ciphers–algorithms used to create and send secret messages! You’ll begin with simple programs for the reverse and Caesar ciphers and then work your way up to public key cryptography, the type of encryption used to secure today’s online transactions, including digital signatures, email, and Bitcoin.

Snippet: Imagine you know someone on the other side of the world who wants to communicate with you. You both know that spy agencies are monitoring all emails, letters, texts, and phone calls. To send a secret message to that person, you both must agree on a secret key to use. But if one of you emails the secret key to the other, the spy agency will intercept this key and then decrypt any future messages using that key. Secretly meeting in person to exchange the key is impossible. You can try encrypting the key, but this requires sending that secret key to the other person, which will also be intercepted.

Public key cryptography solves this encryption problem by using two keys, one for encryption and one for decryption, and is an example of an asymmetric cipher.

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2018 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.

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Spring Moon

Spring Moon

When does spring begin? It depends who you ask! Introduce the two ways to determine the first day of spring and the three different days it is celebrated with an inquiry-based approach.

One of those days is today, February 16th!

Find out more in my February Booklist Quick Tips for School and Libraries Focus on STEM column.

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

P.S. Today’s new moon is the beginning of the lunar cycle. Why not use Lunar New Year as an opportunity to begin a new creative project? All you need to do is write your email address here to sign up for the private 30 Minutes of Creativity Facebook group and our monthly newsletter.

Q. What is in the Naturally Creative newsletter?
A. A creativity link of the month.

Just log in to our private creativity support group on Facebook and add an emoji or write a comment to log the time you worked on your creative project each day. Step by step you will get your project done.

Give it a try and see if it works for you!

Happy Lunar New Year!

Copyright © 2018 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.

 


Daytime Nighttime, All Through the Year

Daytime Nighttime, All Through the Year
by Diane Lang (Author) and Andrea Gabriel (Illustrator)

Booktalk: Animals are so busy! In daytime eagles dive for fish, lizards gobble insects, and tortoises dine on cactus flowers. When night falls, bats catch moths, crickets sing, and cougars prowl. Rhyming verses depict the diverse lives of two animals for each month of the year–one animal that’s active during the day and another active at night, for a total of 24. Additional information and activity suggestions give kids, parents, and teachers ways to explore more about daily rhythms and yearly cycles

Snippet:

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2018 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.


Hop On the Water Cycle

Hop On the Water Cycle
by Nadia Higgins (Author), Sara Infante (Illustrator), and Drew Temperante (Composer)

Booktalk: Learn about the water cycle with catchy lyrics that introduce the three parts of the water cycle. Illustrations with diagrams support the concepts. This hardcover book comes with a CD and online music access.

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It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2018 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.


Google Cybersecurity Expert Parisa Tabriz

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Google Cybersecurity Expert Parisa Tabriz
by Domenica Dipiazza (Author)

Booktalk: As a child, Tabriz loved to play games with her brothers–and she played to win. When she couldn’t outmuscle them, she tried to outsmart them. In high school, she excelled at math and science. She also liked drawing and painting. She considered a career as an artist and even as a police officer. Years later, Tabriz became an information security engineer at Google.

Snippet:

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It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2018 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.


The Empire State Building

The Empire State Building (American Places: from Vision to Reality)
by Meish Goldish (Author)

Booktalk: In 1930, anyone walking down Fifth Avenue in the middle of New York City would have seen an incredible sight. A forest of giant steel beams rose hundreds of feet into the sky. Thousands of men stood on the beams cutting, drilling, and hammering. The workers were constructing the Empire State Building–?the tallest skyscraper the world had ever seen.

Snippet: Before the late 1800s, most buildings were supported by wooden or stone walls. However, these materials weren’t strong enough to support buildings higher than ten stories. In 1855, a process was invented to make steel that was extremely strong and inexpensive. This steel could be used to make beams and columns that supported very tall buildings.

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2018 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.


Dazzle Ships

Dazzle Ships: World War I and the Art of Confusion
by Chris Barton (Author) and‎ Victo Ngai (Illustrator)

Booktalk: Desperate to protect ships from German torpedo attacks, British lieutenant-commander Norman Wilkinson proposed what became known as dazzle. These stunning patterns and colors were meant to confuse the enemy about a ship’s speed and direction. By the end of the war, more than four thousand ships had been painted with these mesmerizing designs.

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It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2018 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.