STEM Friday

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Books


Leave a comment

A Book of Bridges

A Book of Bridges: Here To There and Me To You
by Cheryl Keely (Author) and Celia Krampien (Illustrator)

Booktalk: Bridges are some of the most fascinating structures in our landscape, and they come in all forms. From towering suspension bridges to humble stone crossings, this book visits them all with bouncy text and expository sidebars.

Snippet:
They can be wooden-covered,

golden-gated,

or in London, falling down.

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2017 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.


Tetris

Tetris: The Games People Play
by Box Brown (Author / Illustrator)

Booktalk: Alexey Pajitnov had big ideas about games. In 1984, he created Tetris in his spare time while developing software for the Soviet government. Once Tetris emerged from behind the Iron Curtain, it was an instant hit. Nintendo, Atari, Sega game developers big and small all wanted Tetris. A bidding war was sparked, followed by clandestine trips to Moscow, backroom deals, innumerable miscommunications, and outright theft.

Snippet:



It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2017 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.


Gertrude B. Elion and Pharmacology

Gertrude B. Elion and Pharmacology
by Ellen Labrecque (Author)

Booktalk: A new book in the 21st Century Junior Library: Women Innovators series, this biography introduces young readers to a Nobel Prize winning scientist.

Snippet:

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2017 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.


Finding Wonders

Finding Wonders: Three Girls Who Changed Science
by Jeannine Atkins (Author)

Booktalk: A novel in verse about three girls in three different time periods who grew up to become groundbreaking scientists.

Maria Merian was sure that caterpillars were not wicked things born from mud, as most people of her time believed. Through careful observation she discovered the truth about metamorphosis and documented her findings in gorgeous paintings of the life cycles of insects.

More than a century later, Mary Anning helped her father collect stone sea creatures from the cliffs in southwest England. To him they were merely a source of income, but to Mary they held a stronger fascination. Intrepid and patient, she eventually discovered fossils that would change people’s vision of the past.

Across the ocean, Maria Mitchell helped her mapmaker father in the whaling village of Nantucket. At night they explored the starry sky through his telescope. Maria longed to discover a new comet–and after years of studying the night sky, she finally did.

Snippet:
Rules:

If people catch you with creeping things or wild herbs,
they’ll think they’re for potions or poisons, Sara warns.

Maria tucks the pastry into a basket. She hates
how growing up means more rules instead of fewer.
She’s supposed to walk slower instead of faster,
look around less instead of more.


March is Women’s History Month

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2017 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.


Black History Makers


@Booklist_Briana made a Pinterest board for my February Booklist Quick Tips for Schools and Libraries column: Focus on STEM: Black History Makers.

(And my Booklist editor @gillianengberg added a thumbnail of the cover of my forthcoming picture book Up! Up! Up! Skyscraper (Charlesbridge, May 2017) to the byline.)

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2017 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.


Ultimate Oceanpedia


Ultimate Oceanpedia: The Most Complete Ocean Reference Ever
by Christina Wilsdon (Author)

Booktalk: From tsunamis and sea turtles to riptides and reefs, learn all about the creatures, science, and ecology of our oceans, which cover more of the planet than all the continents and are just as important! Travel through all parts of the ocean to learn how it affects of our world, including storms and climate. Amazing facts, photos, illustrations, and diagrams are found throughout this book, along with conservation tips, weird-but-true facts, and a mini ocean atlas. Challenges to the health of our ocean and its creatures are also presented along with what people are doing to keep it pristine for generations to come.

Snippet:
THE PACIFIC OCEAN
The Pacific Ocean is the largest ocean. It’s so big that it could hold all of the Earth’s continents, with room to spare. It contains nearly half of Earth’s ocean water.

But the Pacific isn’t just the biggest ocean. It’s also the deepest. The average depth of the Pacific is about 14,040 feet (4,280 m)–more than 10 times the height of New York City’s Empire State Building. It’s also home to the deepest place on Earth: Challenger Deep, which sits in the Mariana Trench, a canyon on the ocean floor. Challenger Deep plunges 35,827 feet (11 km).

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2017 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.


Amanda the Mammal

Amanda the Mammal: What Is a Mammal?
by Linda Ayers (Author), Katy Hudson (Illustrator) and Mark Oblinger (Contributor)

Booktalk: Amanda is surprised to learn that she is a mammal. It must be true. She learns the characteristics of mammals in this fun song. (The book comes with a CD.)

Snippet:

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2017 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.