STEM Friday

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Books


1 Comment

Meet My Family!

Meet My Family!: Animal Babies and Their Families
by Laura Purdie Salas (Author) and Stephanie Fizer Coleman (Illustrator)

Booktalk: What kind of families do animal babies have? All different kinds! Meet a wolf pup cared for by the pack, a young orangutan snuggling with its mother high in a tree, a poison dart frog tadpole riding piggyback on its dad, and more. Rhyming verse and informational text help you discover just how diverse the animal kingdom really is!

Snippet:

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2018 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.

Advertisements


Back from the Brink ~ Saving Animals from Extinction

Back from the Brink: Saving animals from extinction, by Nancy F. Castaldo

176 pages; ages 10-12. HMH Books for Young Readers, 2018

“We are not alone on this great spinning planet,” writes Nancy Castaldo. “Alongside us are countless creatures with whom we share the earth’s space and resources. Sometimes we collide, and when we do, it’s usually the animals that lose out.”

In the introduction, Nancy discusses preservation, the Endangered Species Act, and how humans can work together to help repair some of the damage done to wildlife populations. Individual chapters highlight whooping cranes, gray wolves, bald eagles, the giant Galapagos tortoises, American alligators, California condors, and American bison.

Having never had the opportunity to visit the Galapagos, I was intrigued to learn about the tortoises. They are big – weighing 500 or more pounds – and live a long time. One tortoise, owned by Charles Darwin in 1835, died in 2006! These tortoises are crucial member of their ecosystems, Nancy writes. They help distribute seed for plants that, in turn, provide food for birds and lizards.

The problem: goats. Goats introduced to the islands have destroyed the forests that provide important shade and moisture for the tortoises. People brought goats to the island; people can help remove them so the island ecosystem can recover and provide a safe home for the tortoises. Nancy shows how that is happening on one of the island, allowing tortoises to come back from the brink of extinction.

I love the way Nancy ends with a Call to Action. There are specific things that people – even kids – can do to help preserve wildlife. For example, planting native plants could help save endangered butterflies. Making sure your microtrash (bottle caps and other small plastic bits) ends up in the trash bin keeps plastic out of the mouths of wildlife. Preserving wetlands in your area will help the birds and other wildlife that depend on those habitats. Reducing the use of herbicides and other pesticides will keep birds – and humans – healthier.

STEM Friday

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2018 Sue Heavenrich All Rights Reserved.


I Want to Be a Doctor

I Want to Be a Doctor
by Laura Driscoll (Author) and Catalina Echeverri (Illustrator)

Booktalk: Doctors help sick and hurt people feel better. When little brother Jack hurts his foot, the family gets to meet all kinds of doctors. <em<(Level 1 beginning reader).

Snippet:

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2018 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.


Moth and Wasp, Soil and Ocean

Moth and Wasp, Soil and Ocean: Remembering Chinese Scientist Pu Zhelong’s Work for Sustainable Farming
by Sigrid Schmalzer (Author) and Melanie Linden Chan (Illustrator)

Booktalk: In the early 1960s, while Rachel Carson was writing and defending Silent Spring in the U.S., Pu Zhelong was teaching peasants in Mao Zedong’s Communist China how to forgo pesticides and instead use parasitic wasps to control the moths that were decimating crops and contributing to China’s widespread famine.

This story told through the memories of a farm boy (a composite of people inspired by Pu Zhelong) will immerse young readers in Chinese culture, the natural history of insects, and sustainable agriculture.

Snippet:

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2018 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.


Summer!

Summer officially begins next week! Here’s a fun pop-up book to kick off vacation:

Summer, by David A. Carter

12 pages; ages 3-5. Abrams Appleseed, 2018

The summer day is long and warm…

Each spread in this book features brief text and depicts plants and animals that children might see during the summer.

What I like about this book: It’s fun! When you turn the page, a plant or tree pops up (plus the squash that vines from one side of the spread to the other). Birds, animals, fruits, and the occasional feature are labeled, and there is plenty of detail to explore on the page. It almost begs kids to get up and head outside to explore summer. My recommendation: tuck this one in your picnic basket.

 

Head over to Archimedes Notebook for more books and some hands-on explorations.

STEM Friday

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2018 Sue Heavenrich All Rights Reserved.


Charlie Builds

Charlie Builds: Bridges, Skyscrapers, Doghouses, and More!
by Bob Bianchini (Author / Illustrator)

Booktalk: Charlie and his dad build everything together. They build sandcastles at the beach, they build blocks in Dad’s office, and they even build a doghouse for Rocky and a tree house high above the backyard. But Charlie’s favorite thing to build is a pillow fort where he and Dad can cuddle together. A rhyming STEM board book!

Snippet:

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2018 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.


What Do They Do With All That Poo?

At Growing with Science today we are highlighting the new picture book What Do They Do With All That Poo? by Jane Kurtz and illustrated by Allison Black.

Kids of a certain age love these topics.

For the text, Jane Kurtz uses a two level approach. Across the top of the pages is a bouncy rhyme, which is fantastic for educators who want to read the book aloud to young children. Across the bottom of the pages are denser sentences geared for older readers who want to find out more information.

Using twelve animal examples, — from bats to rhinos — Kurtz explains how the variation in their poo results from differences in the animals’ nutrition and digestion. For example, panda poo is mostly undigested bamboo, so it is green and not smelly at all. On the other hand, penguin poo is fishy.

The author also includes information about how zoos handle the disposal of animal wastes, including composting. There’s even a surprise or two at the end.

What Do They Do With All That Poo? is a perfect book to accompany a trip to the zoo, farm, or wildlife habitat. Check out a copy today!

See the rest of the review and more stuff at the blog.