STEM Friday

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Books

Just Hatched: books about birds

Birds are back! They’re gathering nesting materials, checking out the bugs in the garden, and filling the morning with song. Here are three recently hatched books to tickle your bird-lover’s thirst for true stories.

Duckings (Explore my World series)

by Marfe Ferguson Delano

ages 3-7; National Geographic Kids, 2017

High in a tree, a wood duck mother checks her nest.She sits on her eggs to keep them warm. Then one day, peck, peck, peck. Ducklings are ready to hatch. Large-print words or simple phrases set off sections of a baby bird’s life. Crack! They hatch. Jump! They leap out of the nest and down, down, down … to a pond. Text describes the life of a duckling, and photos invite us right into their day, from learning what to eat (bugs are good) to following mom everywhere. Back matter includes comparing ducks with other animals that hatch out of eggs, “ducky details”, and how to be a duckling.

Otis the Owl

by Mary Holland

ages 4-9; Arbordale Publishing, 2017

Beautiful, detailed photos take us right into the first few months of a baby owl’s life. Otis, and his sister, are the cutest, fluffiest sad-eyed babies you’ve ever seen. Mary Holland shows all aspects of a baby owl’s life, from hatching to eating voles, mice, and the occasional chipmunk. Sometimes Otis and his sister fight over the food their parents bring. Other times, he and sis are best friends, preening each other’s feathers and standing watch at the nest hole. Back matter includes information on owl pellets, a guessing game, and details on owl anatomy.

Birds Make Nests

by Michael Garland

ages 4-8; Holiday House, 2017

Two-page spreads show a diversity of birds and the nests they build. Some nest in trees, others nest on the ground. Some use grass to make their nest, or animal hair, spider silk, lichens. Others use sticks and mud. Some nests open at the top; some nests open at the bottom. Kids might recognize some as visitors to their back yard or local park. Others live half-way around the world, giving parents an opportunity to show on a globe or world map where those birds build their nests.

Dive into the “Beyond the book” activities at Archimedes Notebook

STEM Friday

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

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Author: Sue Heavenrich

I write about science and environmental issues for children and their families.

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