STEM Friday

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Books

Does the Sun Sleep?

Does the Sun Sleep?
written by Martha E.H. Rustad; illustrated by Holli Conger
2016 (Millbrook Press)
Source: Review copy provided by the publisher

“I get it!” says Deon. “When it’s day on one side of Earth, it’s night on the other side.”

If you want the sun, the moon, and the stars, you should go to Mr. Cruz’s classroom. His class is working on making observations and noticing patterns in nature. The first pattern they notice is day and night. Mr. Cruz leads a discussion of the movement of the Earth which makes it look like the Sun is moving. Using a flashlight and a globe, he explains how the sun shines on only part of the planet at a time. Blue boxes on each spread add facts to the narrative. On this spread, readers learn that it takes the Earth 24 hours to spin around once, which is another pattern. Moving on to the moon, the class views a monthly chart of the phases of the moon. Stocked up on AA batteries, Mr. Cruz uses his flashlight, the globe, and a small model of the moon to explain how light from the Sun shines on the moon. Finally, the class discusses stars, why we can’t see them in the daylight (Except for the Sun.), and how they have patterns as well.

Does the Sun Sleep? does a great job of explaining information about space in simple language, but also doesn’t shy away from using vocabulary like horizon, waxing, and waning.  This is a good text to share with first graders who study patterns and cycles in space. The illustrations are terrific visuals that help explain the facts given in the text. First graders will especially like the phases of the moon chart. Grab your flashlight and follow Mr. Cruz’s lead!

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Author: bargerj

I am a literacy coach in North Carolina. I blog at NC Teacher Stuff and write children's books.

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