STEM Friday

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Books


Coding with ScratchJr

Coding with ScratchJr
by Adrienne Matteson (Author)

Booktalk: ScratchJr is a beginner’s programming language that is fun and easy to use. Through simple text written to foster creativity and problem solving, students will learn the art of innovation. Large, colorful images show students how to complete activities.

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It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2017 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.


To the Edge of the Universe!

to-edge-of-universeTo the Edge of the Universe, a 14-foot fold-out journey

by Raman Prinja; illus. by John Hersey

36 pages; 8-12 years

Carlton Kids, 2016

Above earth is an atmosphere, and beyond that the space station and the moon, the sun, 8 planets, an asteroid belt, supernovas, more galaxies until you reach… the edge of the known universe.

What I like about this book: The pages are connected in a long, long, long (14-foot long) mural that takes you from the earth’s surface to the edge of the universe. On the reverse side  are facts, graphs, charts, constellations… answers to the questions you’ll be asking as you explore the universe. I also love the interaction requires for this book. You can unfold the entire mural – indeed, you could (if you want to) cut it off the cover and tape it to the wall. It’s just plain fun.

Head over to Archimedes Notebook for another space book and hands-on activities for budding space cadets.

STEM Friday

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Site Meter Copyright © 2017 Sue Heavenrich All Rights Reserved.


Mind-Boggling Numbers

Mind-Boggling Numbers
by Michael J. Rosen (Author) and Julia Patton (Illustrator)

Booktalk: If you could hike to the moon, how long would it take? Just how many glasses of lemonade would you need to fill an Olympic-size swimming pool? If everyone on Earth owned exactly the same amount of land, how big would your yard be? And how much time would you spend mowing the lawn? Ms. Mary Math answers the questions . . .

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It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2017 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.


Animal Planet’s Strange Animals

We seem to have an animal theme going on today at STEM Friday. I’m featuring a Cybils finalist in the elementary/juvenile nonfiction categoryAnimal Planet Strange, Unusual, Gross & Cool Animals by Charles Ghigna.

animal-planet-strange-animals

Kids go wild over these kinds of books. With over 200 photographs of weird animals and text by award-winning poet and children’s author Charles Ghigna, how can you go wrong?

First up are the Strange animals. Some of the animals include the blobfish, which was once voted the world’s ugliest animal (see video below); the red-lipped batfish, which turns out can’t swim very well; and the lowland streaked tenrec, a tiny animal which looks like it got tangled up with the spines of a porcupine. After all the weird creatures in that section, it’s hard to imagine what they found for the Unusual, Gross, and Cool animal categories that follow.

Budding zoologists will definitely dare take a look at Animal Planet Strange, Unusual, Gross & Cool Animals. In fact, even the most reluctant reader will want to explore it. Check out a copy today!

Hop, leap or fly over to Growing with Science blog for a review, suggested activity, and a video about that really strange blobfish.

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It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Site Meter Copyright © 2016 Roberta Gibson at Growing with Science All Rights Reserved.

 


Animals by the Numbers

animals-by-the-numbersAnimals by the Numbers: a book of animal infographics

by Steve Jenkins

48 pages; ages 6-9

HMH, 2016

How much do all the humans on earth weigh? Without adding up everyone’s weight, we have to make an estimate, and that comes to around 350 million tons. That’s a lot, right?

So how much would all the insects on earth weigh? Best estimate of that comes to 100 billion tons – about 15 tons for every person on earth. To help put these huge numbers into context, Steve Jenkins creates infographics – charts, tables, diagrams, and graphs that illustrate information.

He uses bar graphs to compare how fast animals swim, fly, and run and how far animals jump. There are pie charts and “thermometer” graphs, maps and a very cool decision tree illustrating the sorts of things that might run through a small animal’s mind when another creature approaches: does it look dangerous? Does it see me?

What I like about this book: it presents facts about animals in a fun way. Sure, you could read a page telling how fast different animals run, but a chart comparing those speeds makes you think about information in a different way. The way he presents the information is as fun as the questions he explores: how fast do critters have to flap their wings to stay airborne? How many hours a day do animals sleep compared to their waking time?

And, for us writers, Jenkins includes a pie chart showing how he spent his time making the book (5% spent staring into space).  Review copy provided by the publisher.

STEM Friday

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Site Meter Copyright © 2017 Sue Heavenrich All Rights Reserved.


How Things Work

How Things Work
by T.J. Resler (Author)

Booktalk: Ever wanted to take apart the microwave to see how it works? Crack open your computer and peek inside? Intrigued by how things work? So are we! That’s why we’re dissecting all kinds of things from rubber erasers to tractor beams! Read along as National Geographic Kids unplugs, unravels, and reveals how things do what they do.

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Touchy Subject
Touching a screen is a handy way to control a tablet. But how can a tablet understand what you’re tapping and swiping with your fingers?

Shocking?
Tablets read your touches by sensing electrical charges. No shocks involved.

E. M. Forster

Long before 2001: A Space Odyssey and Star Trek, writer E. M. Forster envisioned a type of tablet. In his 1909 science-fiction story “THE MACHINE STOPS,” people communicated through handheld round plates, a type of live video call.

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2016 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.