STEM Friday

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Books


A Charm of Goldfinches

A Charm of Goldfinches and Other Wild Gatherings: Quirky Collective Nouns of the Animal Kingdom by Matt Sewell (Author / Illustrator)

Booktalk: Most groups of wildlife can be described as a flock, herd, or shoal–but where is the fun in ending there? The book is divided into four sections. Discover the secret behind a “sleuth of bears” on the Land pages, keep your eyes open for a “watch of nightingales” on the Air pages, and learn something new about a “school of whales” in the Water pages. Then check off the animals you’ve see in real life on the Spotting and Jotting pages.

Snippet:

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2017 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.

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Can an aardvark Bark?

by Melissa Stewart; illustrated by Steve Jenkins

Can an Aardvark Bark?

No, but it can grunt. Lots of other animals grunt too.

This is such a fun book, filled with barks, squeals, grunts, roars, and whines. Also bellows, growls, and laughs. Animals, it turns out, make all kinds of sounds. For all kinds of reasons – and Melissa gives us an inside look at what those sounds mean.

What I like LOVE about this book: The sounds! If you’re reading it out loud, expect your listeners to bellow, roar, grunt, and bark along with the animals. Every page if filled with SOUND – and plenty of examples of animals that make those sounds. Did you know that frogs bark and rats chortle? OK, I’ve heard frogs bark and quack, but laughing? I haven’t heard wild things laugh, chortle, or giggle with glee. But they do and Melissa gives us the facts.

I love the illustrations! Steve Jenkins does such spectacular work, and it’s always fun to open up a new book filled with his cut-and-torn-paper artwork.

And then there’s the structure! This is subtle and it took me a couple pages to realize what was going on – but then I discovered a pattern to the questions and the answers.I don’t want to spoil the fun of discovering it yourself.

But the best thing? Readers learn that animals use a diverse array of sounds to communicate their thoughts and feelings. Just like people do. This is the perfect book to share with a kid who dreams of becoming a translator for their dog, cat, snake, goldfish, or pet rock. OK, maybe not the rock…

Head over to Archimedes Notebook for some Beyond the Book activities, and on Monday hop over to the GROG Blog where Melissa will share her story of how lo-o-o-ong it took to go from idea to book.

STEM Friday

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Site Meter Copyright © 2017 Sue Heavenrich All Rights Reserved.


William’s 100th Day of School

William’s 100th Day of School
by Lisa Bullard (Author) and Mike Byrne (Illustrator)

Booktalk: Counting to the 100th day of school begins now! See how William’s class celebrates 100 Day with an exciting show-and-tell time, by learning to count to 100 in new ways, and even with a parade.

Snippet: On the first day of school, my teacher, Mr. Zimmer, wrote “1” on the calendar.

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2017 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.


Jump, Leap, Count Sheep!

Jump, Leap, Count Sheep!

by Geraldo Valerio

24 pages; ages 2-5

OwlKids, 2017

One, two, three, here they come… Canadian animals.

This counting book has a twist: all the animals live in Canada. So kids are learning about their local wildlife as they learn the numbers.

What I like about this book: It’s fun! The illustrations are stylized and imaginative, and may inspire kids (and adults) to try their hand at drawing local wildlife. Each page presents a number three ways: the numeral (3), the word (three), and the correct number of critters being introduced. But Wait! There’s More! There are other elements on the page to count, such as the prey that mantids are hunting. The animals are also active, so active verbs are featured: hunting, jumping, swimming…

Head over to Archimedes Notebook for more math books and activities.

STEM Friday

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Site Meter Copyright © 2017 Sue Heavenrich All Rights Reserved.


How to Survive as a Firefly

How to Survive as a Firefly

by Kristen Foote; illus. by Erica Salcedo

36 pages; ages 5-10

Innovation Press

“Up and at ’em, larvae.” The drill sergeant calls out his young troops to get them ready for life as an adult firefly. He’s been in the trenches for a year and a half, and he knows a thing or two…

First, there’s tricks to getting through metamorphosis.

“Met-a-more-for-what?” ask the youngsters. Oh boy. This bug’s got his work cut out for him. Thing is, you’ve gotta get ready to change because you just can’t stay a larva forever. And if you’re a firefly larva, that means COMPLETE metamorphosis – turning into a pupa and….

“Can we get a snack first?”

Written in dialog, this is a fun, fun, fun introduction to insect morphology, physiology, and Photinus pyralis – fireflies for you two-leggers. There are lessons on bioluminescence, flashy facts, and lots of humor – and of course, a pop quiz at the end.

Back matter includes Frequently Asked Questions and an author’s note in which Kristen promises that no actual fireflies were harmed in the creation of the book. There’s even a glossary.

For more buggy books, head over to Archimedes Notebook.

STEM Friday

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Site Meter Copyright © 2017 Sue Heavenrich All Rights Reserved.


Concrete Mixers Stir!

Concrete Mixers Stir!
by Beth Bence Reinke (Author)

Booktalk: What truck do you need when you want to make a new sidewalk? A concrete mixer! Concrete mixers bring concrete to construction sites. From a goopy mixture to dry concrete, concrete mixers are there to help.

Snippet:

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Copyright © 2017 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.


More bug books…

One can never have too many bug books, right? So while it’s bug season, I’ll be reviewing the buggy books in my basket.

Dawn Publications, 2017

There’s a Bug on my Book! by John Himmelman

The best thing about summer is reading outside. That’s what this book is all about: sitting on the grass with a …

“Hey! there’s a bug on my book! It’s a beetle.”

Okay, we can handle that. Just puff a breath of air on it to get it moving. Now, back to reading. Yikes! now there’s a snake slithering across the page.

What I like about this book: it invites readers to tilt the book (so the snake slides back into the grass), to nudge a bug, to be patient while a slug meanders across the page. At the same time, John Himmelman shares observations about the insects, spiders, worms, and other …. what’s that? A frog just plopped onto the page! Another thing I like about this book is the back matter. Four Pages! That’s where you learn more about each critter that slithered, slimed, hopped, wiggled, and plopped across the pages of the book. There are also activities that explore how bugs move, habitat, and “design a bug”.

National Geographic Kids, 2017

Explore My World: Honey Bees, by Jill Esbaum

Easy to read and understand, the text describes the life of a honey bee. There’s nectar-collecting, loading up the pollen baskets (which, we learn, can be a messy job), and carting the food back home. The hive is a busy place, with so many sisters and a queen, and there’s lots of work to do in hive as well. We see the bee life cycle, meet a newly emerged bee who is immediately given a task: clean your room! Back matter includes more details about honey, pollination, the waggle dance, and a maze.

Hungry Tomato, 2016

Incredible Bugs (series: Animal Bests), by John Farndon; illus. by Cristina Portolano

This is a fun, browsable book with a table of contents so you can find what you’re looking for fast (if you want). Sections include smartest bugs, communication, special senses, builders, tool users, teamwork, migration, and special skills. You’ll discover maze-solving spiders, dragonfly flight instruments, and which bug can leap tall buildings in a single jump. Text is accompanied by cartoons and photos.

Looking for Bug Activities? Head over to Archimedes Notebook to check out these Wednesday Explorers Club posts about Hummingbird Moths and Smelly Bee Feet.

 

 

STEM Friday

It’s STEM Friday! (STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

Site Meter Copyright © 2017 Sue Heavenrich All Rights Reserved.